Birds in Winter Wildlife Garden

Carolina Wren in the SnowCaring for birds in the winter wildlife garden means providing three essential elements: Food, Water, and Shelter

It snowed this weekend and the temperatures have plummeted to below freezing, and will remain there all week. And I have to admit, being cold makes me cranky. But I am tucked cozily under a blanket inside my house. It’s the birds that live in my wildlife garden that I’m thinking about now.

While I will venture out into the cold this weekend in hopes of being able to get a good view of one of the many Snowy Owls who have appeared far out of their normal range during this Owl irruption, I’m reminded of the sad fact that there are so many Snowy Owls around because there is not enough food for them in their normal tundra habitats.

As I watch the Cardinals, Chickadees, Tufted Titmouse, Dark-eyed Juncos, and Carolina Wrens in my snow-covered wildlife garden, I’m thinking about how an Ecosystem Garden can provide the three essential elements these birds must have to survive the cold winter weather.

Read more about Caring for Birds in the Winter Wildlife Garden at Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens

Check out my new free online course Ecosystem Gardening Essentials, 15 free lessons delivered to your inbox every week, teaching you to garden sustainably, conserve natural resources, and create welcoming habitat for wildlife in your garden.

© 2013 – 2014, Carole Sevilla Brown. All rights reserved. This article is the property of EcosystemGardening.com If you are reading this at another site, please report that to us

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About Carole Sevilla Brown

Carole Sevilla Brown is a Conservation Biologist who firmly believes that wildlife conservation begins in your own back yard. Carole is an author, educator, speaker, and passionate birder, butterfly watcher,  and naturalist who travels around the country teaching people to garden sustainably, conserve natural resources, and create welcoming habitat for wildlife so that you will attract more birds, butterflies, pollinators and other wildlife. She gardens for wildlife in Philadelphia, zone 6b, and created the philosophy of Ecosystem Gardening. Watch for her book Ecosystem Gardening, due out soon. Carole is managing editor of  Beautiful Wildlife Garden, and also  Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens. Follow Carole on Facebook and also @CB4wildlife and on Google+

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