Sustainable Gardening, wildlife garden chores, agaves, and Wild Gardens, Best of Web 21

Tree Swallow

Tree Swallows have returned

I’ve been a busy little bee trying to launch a new project, but I’m also trying to get back on our regularly scheduled program here. To that end let’s take a look at the Best of the Web for this week.

Remember that if you want to open the links in a new page/tab, you need to right click the link and choose that option.

Did you know that wildlife gardeners have a completely different list of spring chores than other gardeners? Karyl at Native Plant Wildlife Gardening has written an amusing and fun article about her spring chores in her wildlife garden. Follow @habitatgarden

If you’d like to Lessen Your Footprint with Sustainable Gardening, check out Helen Yoest’s post. You may remember that Helen’s Garden was chosen by you (our wonderful readers) as the favorite Ecosystem Garden for 2009. She makes Sustainable Gardening very interesting! Follow @HelenYoest

Have you ever thought that Gardening on a Small Budget Sometimes Misses the Big Picture? Kathy Green, of Gardening for Nature discusses Sustainable Gardening and how not to miss the point when you’re working on a small budget. Follow @gardenfornature

I’m having some warmer climate envy. So I was thrilled to discover a new blog, Native Gardener, who is located in Topanga Canyon California. Follow the amazing growth of one agave plant. It’s beautiful! Follow @nativegardener

Another newly discovered blog for me is Native Plants with Adam’s Garden. I’m so excited every time I find another native plant/wildlife loving blogger! Discover the wild garden through his eyes. Join his Facebook fanpage

Liisa in Vermont is a wonderful blog by an artist, photographer, poet, nature-loving gardener. I’ve just come across her blog and really enjoyed looking through her beautiful photographs. Check out In Search of Spring for Bloom Day, where I was particularly struck by the beautiful doorways and flowers.

Andrew Keys at Garden Smackdown has issued a challenge for us all to take an inventory of the native plants in our gardens. This is a great way to become familiar with the place of origin for all the plants in our gardens. Are you up to the challenge?

The Ecosystem Gardening newsletter, Wren Song, is going strong, bringing you tips for bringing more wildlife into your garden, resources to help you and breaking news. If you want to be the first to know, even before it’s announced here, you need to sign up in the Wren Song box at the top right of this page. Don’t miss a thing!

These are the most fascinating stories I found from around the web this week, but I’m sure I may have missed something. What grabbed your attention this week? What’s the news from your garden? Please share your wildlife garden adventures with us by leaving a comment below.

© 2010, Carole Sevilla Brown. All rights reserved. This article is the property of EcosystemGardening.com If you are reading this at another site, please report that to us

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About Carole Sevilla Brown

Carole Sevilla Brown is a Conservation Biologist who firmly believes that wildlife conservation begins in your own back yard. Carole is an author, educator, speaker, and passionate birder, butterfly watcher,  and naturalist who travels around the country teaching people to garden sustainably, conserve natural resources, and create welcoming habitat for wildlife so that you will attract more birds, butterflies, pollinators and other wildlife. She gardens for wildlife in Philadelphia, zone 6b, and created the philosophy of Ecosystem Gardening. Watch for her book Ecosystem Gardening, due out soon. Carole is managing editor of  Beautiful Wildlife Garden, and also  Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens. Follow Carole on Facebook and also @CB4wildlife and on Google+

Comments

  1. Hi Carole, thanks for mentioning me once again! I am so looking forward to working with you on your new project, and know it will be as educational to all as your blog has been. I will go over to the Garden Smackdown to see how to take inventory in the garden, although the yard is currently covered in snow.

    Happy first day of Spring!!

    Kathy
    .-= Kathy Green´s last blog ..Gardening on Small Budget sometimes misses Big Picture =-.

  2. Thanks for the yummy reading list!
    .-= Michelle Clay´s last blog ..After the Flood =-.

  3. Hi Carole,
    Thank you so much for the link. I recently discovered your blog as well, and am so happy that I did. You have such a wealth of information here. You have introduced me to some new blogs, and I look forward to visiting. Happy Spring!! :)
    .-= Liisa´s last blog ..In Search of Spring for Bloom Day =-.

    • Carole Brown says:

      Liisa, I so love when I am so pleasantly surprised in my travels around the net. The day I found your blog was a happy one indeed!

  4. Thank you for the mention. You’ve also listed some of my favorite blogs here, I am flattered to be in such good company.
    .-= Karyl´s last blog ..Native Trees and Shrubs in My Garden =-.

    • Carole Brown says:

      Karyl, that was a wonderful article about wildlife garden chores. I really enjoyed reading it. I just love your sense of humor.

  5. Thanks SO much for the shout-out, Carole! I’ve so enjoyed reading others’ inventories. It’s been a rewarding exercise for me as a designer, an advocate for sustainability, and a plant geek.
    .-= Andrew´s last blog ..Roll Call: Native Plants In My Garden =-.

    • Carole Brown says:

      Andrew, the plant inventory is a great idea! Knowing what we have and what is thriving will help us decide what we can add that will also thrive. It’s a wonderful way to get to know our gardens better.

  6. Carole, Thanks again for including me in this list of blogs, week 21, showcasing native plants. I am delighted you enjoyed “One Agave’s Amazing Journey” and hope you will have a chance to read “An Aloe from Louise.”
    Kathy @nativegardener recently posted..An Aloe From Louise

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